Archive for the 'Company News' Category

Something Great Gets Even Better

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

Griego CS5
Click image for larger view

Since their introduction, Getzen Custom Series trombones have led the industry in performance, quality, and unmatched value. With such overwhelming acceptance and outstanding designs, it is tough to find ways to improve each model. One can only take perfection so far. Rather than scratching their heads in a vain search for improvements, Getzen decided to elevate the overall package. To achieve this goal, Getzen has partnered with Christan Griego, Director of Research & Development for Edwards Instrument Company. Both are eager to announce the exciting addition of custom Griego Mouthpieces to the full line up of Getzen Custom Series trombones.

Griego Mouthpieces is a family owned company founded in 2001 by Christan Griego. A lifetime of playing trombone and a decade with Edwards has allowed Christan to study under and work with some of the world’s finest players. In that time, he realized that many players were facing the same problems he was. Problems that weren’t being solved by practice alone. After some research, Christan found that the true cause for many trombone players’ headaches were shortcomings in the design and manufacturing techniques of many mouthpiece makers. His experience allowed Christan to gain a unique insight into the wants and needs of players from all corners of the world. He took that knowledge and translated it into a superior mouthpiece design that is conceived and manufactured by/for trombone players. Seeing this success led Getzen to enlist Christan to utilize his skill and experience in designing a mouthpiece tailor made for the Getzen Custom Series trombones. After months of research and testing, that mouthpiece is here.

Beginning in 2007, all newly ordered Custom Series 3508 Jazz, 3047 Tenor, and 3062 Bass trombones will come standard with a Griego mouthpiece. Years of experience with the Custom Series line have enabled Christan to create a mouthpiece specifically designed for each of the three trombone models. Each of the mouthpieces are precisely machined and expertly finished creating the perfect compliment to the unparalleled Custom Series trombone line.

Best of all, the mouthpieces are included with the new trombones at no cost. Mouthpieces can also be added to existing orders for a nominal charge. Additionally, each can be purchased separately from local Getzen dealers. Not only will it improve the performance of the trombones, but also add an outstanding value to the overall package. While others in the industry are offering only “throw away” mouthpieces, Getzen is including a premium mouthpiece with a $130 retail value. Increased performance and overall value; the great does indeed get better!

For more information on Getzen trombones visit www.Getzen.com/trombone. To learn more about Griego Mouthpieces visit www.griegomouthpieces.com.

Welcome On Board: Jim Stella

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

Jim Stella
Jim Stella

In September, 2006 the Getzen team proudly added another member. Jim Stella joined the company as the new Assistant Plant Manager. Prior to coming to Getzen, Jim gained decades of experience in the design, manufacture, and sales of brass instruments while working for Martin, LeBlanc, and most recently Conn-Selmer. As Tom Getzen put it, “Jim brings with him an invaluable level of experience that will help us move forward for many years to come.

The All New Eterna Proteus

Thursday, May 3rd, 2007

Eterna ProteusEterna Proteus

In 1962, the Getzen Company set the trumpet world abuzz with the introduction of the first 900 Eterna trumpet. In 2001, after decades of design changes, that legendary trumpet was returned in the form of the 900 Eterna Classic. Then, in 2004, the Eterna line was enhanced yet again with the introduction of the 900SB Eterna Sterling trumpet. Now the historic Eterna trumpet line is being expanded further with the exciting addition of the 907S Eterna Proteus Bb trumpet.

So what is the Proteus? Just like the name implies, it’s a versatile, all around trumpet. After nearly fifty years at the top of the Eterna line, the 900 Classic doesn’t meet the needs of some of today’s players. Many are seeking a more centered, flexible trumpet rather than the bright, lead style of the Eterna Classic. That is exactly what the Proteus was designed to deliver.

Design aspects such as the heat treated, two piece, #137 yellow brass bell and custom gold brass mouthpipe combine to make the Proteus better suited for chamber and orchestral work than its well know predecessor. Meanwhile, standard features like bright silver plate, fixed third slide ring, and lever waterkeys establish the Proteus as an outstanding value. A true upper level trumpet at a mid-grade price.

Extending a Helping Hand

Wednesday, October 4th, 2006

Brandt Brass Band Click image for larger view

In the fall of 2005, I was contacted by Mike Vax. Not a big surprise since Mike checks in with us at the factory quite a bit. This call was different. Mike was looking for our help. Some friends in I.T.G. had passed a story on to him that he thought we would be able to assist with. A group of musicians were having trouble getting instruments. Specifically a piccolo trumpet. The musicians were members of the Brandt Brass Band of Saratov, Russia. A very talented group rapidly making a name for themselves. Up until that point, the band was forced to borrow a piccolo trumpet from a neighboring town’s band. Not at all an ideal situation. In an effort to alleviate this, the members of the band were able to scrape together a few hundred dollars. By no means was that enough to purchase a new piccolo. They were hoping that through contacts in I.T.G. they would be able to find a used piccolo at a reasonable price. Enter Mike Vax.

Mike called us after he heard the tale and asked if there was anything we could do to help. Trumpet players around the U.S. had heard of the band’s troubles and were donating money to the cause hoping to boost the band’s buying power. Mike wanted to know if we had an old or seconds piccolo around that we could sell the band directly. We did not. After discussing the situation with my father Tom Getzen, we came up with a better solution. Rather than selling the band an old horn, we decided to give them, free of charge, a brand new 3916 Custom Series piccolo. From our standpoint, we had been fortunate in life and this was a perfect opportunity to pass that along. At the time, Tom relayed a lesson to me that my grandfather had taught him. At some point in life, you’ll have the chance to help someone else. While the time, effort, or dollar amount may not seem like much to you, to them it will mean the world. This was a perfect example of one of those situations.

Immediately, I got a hold of Mike and told him the good news. He was ecstatic and quickly passed the development on to his friends in I.T.G. The news spread fast and I was inundated with emails and phone calls thanking me for our donation. That’s not the reason we did it, but they were all appreciated. As word spread of our donation, trumpeters continued to donate money to the band. The new plan was that the band could use that money to help pay for a quality recording of the band with a CD to follow. I’m personally excited for that since I have heard nothing but praise for the band’s performances and I’m anxious to hear them for myself.

Soon after we decided to donate the horn, I was contacted by Mr. Gary Mortenson. He had great news. Gary had arranged for Steve Chenette, a former President of I.T.G, to deliver the horn and cash donations to the band during a visit to Russia. This was great, as it would ensure the horn made it to the band in good condition. Once the method of delivery had been established I had the piccolo prepped and shipped it to Steve. I also sent along several care kits (valve oil, cleaning cloths, etc…) for the band.

Once the piccolo was on the way to Steve and all the arrangements had been made, the members of the Brandt Brass Band emailed me to express their thanks. They asked me to pass on their “endless thankful words to all the people who some how took part in our life and help us to work better”. A few weeks later they also took the time to send me a nice Christmas greeting. I was honored that they would take the time and proud that they were so excited to get the instrument.

Fast forward to March of this year. Steve Chenette made his way to Russia with the piccolo and donations in tow. He emailed me from Saratov to tell me how excited the members of the band were upon his arrival. In fact, they couldn’t wait to try the horn. Instead, they spent nearly a week playing and practicing on it so they could use it in a concert shortly after the “official” presentation. After having the 3916 for a few days, Oleg Abramov emailed me to pass on their feelings. “Our trumpeters now behave like children.” Oleg said. “Everyone is trying to play it and they are always discussing it.” He went on to say, “Thanks a lot for the wonderful gift! We haven’t had such a trumpet until this in Saratov! So I think now it’s the most beautiful treasure in musical Saratov.” When asked how the players felt about the horn Oleg said, “Our piccolo player, Nikolay Khudoshin, is very delighted with the instrument. It’s very beautiful, has reach and a wonderful sound. It reacts on every breath you put into it!” “As our guys are joking,” Oleg wrote, “we have a beautiful blond, but we haven’t chosen her name yet. An enormous huge Thank You! If you’ll need something someday you must remember that you have 3 friends in Saratov, Russia that have close relations with one of your girls.” You cannot imagine my sense of pride. Knowing that not only were we able to help, but that the piccolo was met with such high regard. That, after all, is the most important thing. In July, Oleg Abramov contacted me to say that Nikolay Khudoshin enjoys the piccolo more with each practice. He went on to say that they have chosen music for their upcoming recording. The band will be performing Mozart’s The Night Queen’s Aria from The Magic Flute. I’m sure I’m not the only one anxiously awaiting its release.

All in all, this was a very rewarding experience for the company as a whole and for me personally. It was great to see the trumpet world come together to help their brothers in need. I am just glad that we could have a small part in the effort. Hopefully the piccolo will serve the band for years to come. I wish them and everyone who helped them continued success in all of their future endeavors.

News Coverage Videos: Channel IST | Channel Russia

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A Visit From Bugles Across America

Wednesday, October 4th, 2006

Bugles Across America visits the Getzen Company
As a part of their 2006 convention near Chicago, several members of Bugles Across America visited the Getzen Company for a tour and a luncheon. B.A.A. is an organization dedicated to providing volunteer buglers to sound Taps at military funerals. Several of their members were instrumental in the development of the Getzen American Heritage Field Trumpet. For more information on Bugles Across America visit www.BuglesAcrossAmerica.org.

Improving from Start to “Finish”

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2006

At Getzen, we pride ourselves on our industry leading quality and we are constantly striving to find ways to improve our products even more. In that effort, we have made two key advancements in our production.

First is a new, cutting edge, aqueous ultra sonic cleaning system. This process uses a combination of special cleaning solutions and ultrasonic tanks to remove oils and other surface contaminates left behind during manufacturing. The process leaves the surface clean and prepared for lacquering or plating. A clean surface is key to bright plating as well as preventing acid bleeds and other lacquer defects.

The second advancement is an all new silver plating system. Our constant strives for improvement led us to create a new solution and implement new plating methods. Together, this provides a stronger, more durable bond with a brighter, richer silver finish.

Matching the Outside with the Inside

Monday, October 2nd, 2006

Field Trumpet Case Click image for larger view

The American Heritage Field Trumpet has served to show the proper respect to American’s veterans. Now a new case will also reflect those strong feelings of patriotism. The case features the same great protection in a lightweight package as before, but in red, white, and blue colors. Contact your local Getzen dealer or Bugles Across America for more information.

Photo Album

Monday, October 2nd, 2006

Getzen Display 2006 Musik Messe
Once again, Getzen proudly displayed the full line during the 2006 Musik Messe in Frankfurt, Germany. Long time fans and first time Getzen buyers visited the booth during the 4 day event.
Mike Lekrone and Mike Vax
University of Wisconsin marching band director Mike Lekrone visits with Mike Vax after a jazz performance in Madison, WI this past May.
Music Messe Dinner
Tom Getzen (front left) treated Swiss distributor Peter Marcandella (far right) along with Getzen’s Dave Surber (rear center) and Brett Getzen (far left) to dinner at Claudia’s in Sachsenhausen, Frankfurt. All four were sure to thank owner, Eisa-Mohammed Solaimaukehel (front right) for another fantastic dinner.
Dave Allison
Dave Allison worked with the Brea High School Marching Band during a clinic sponsored by Getzen and Pecknel Music. Dave is a well regarded player/clinician and has worked closely with Pecknel all over South Carolina.
Jack Long and his Getzen 900 Eterna Classic
Jack Long shows off his new custom made 900 Eterna Classic. The trumpet was presented to Mr. Long to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Long & McQuade Musical Instruments in Canada. The trumpet featured hand engraving, custom etchings, and a gold trim kit. As Mr. Long put it, “I can’t think of a gift I would have appreciated as much.”
Tom Getzen and Haim Attias
In Frankfurt, Tom Getzen gladly welcomed Haim Attias from Getzen’s Israeli distributor Hamusica Musical Instruments. Haim wanted to learn more about Custom Series trumpets to meet the growing demand in Israel for quality instruments.

Happy Anniversary, Getzen!

Saturday, March 4th, 2006

by Milo Greene

Happy Anniversary
1991: Bob Getzen (right) and his son Tom (center) celebrate the purchase with Tom’s sons Brett (left) and Adam (center)
(Click image for larger view)

March of 2006 marks a great achievement for the Getzen family. That month they will be celebrating the 15th anniversary of the family buying back the company bearing its name.

In 1991 the Getzen Company’s production and financial troubles finally came to a head as the company filed for bankruptcy. Finally, after 31 years, there was an opportunity for the Getzen family to once again own the company. After a few months of negotiation Allied Music Corporation, owned and operated by the grandsons of Getzen’s founder, purchased the Getzen Company’s name and assets. “It was a lot of work and a long hard process,” recollects Tom Getzen. “At times, it seemed like the purchase would never get done. When it was finally over though, it was one of the proudest moments of my life.”

Immediately after the purchase, things began to change. First, the majority of Getzen’s employees and equipment were moved from the facility on Centralia Street to Allied Music’s building on the other side of town. This doubled the size of Allied Music. In order to accommodate the sudden increase, an 18,000 square foot addition was built. The addition included a new bell department, buffing room, water treatment center, dent department, and several offices. As the Getzen employees moved into their new home the skilled Allied Music staff met them with open arms. They were also met with new and repaired equipment along with improved working conditions. It didn’t take long before they realized the general philosophy of the company had changed as well. “One of the first things we did was let the employees know that things were going to change,” says Tom. “We wanted to turn things around to make the company a leader again and we needed their help to do it. We couldn’t stress that enough.”

Reestablishing the company’s place in the industry was difficult. “For years, the overall quality of Getzen products had slipped,” Tom notes. “Our first priority and biggest obstacle was to change public perception about the Getzen name.” The new Getzen Company wasted no time as the entire product line was reevaluated. Models were closely examined with some being eliminated all together. Design tweaks and corrections were performed to improve the remaining instruments. New models were also added to incorporate instrument designs previously used by Allied Music. At the same time, every aspect of production was evaluated to improve not only labor time, but also finished instrument quality. As Tom says, “It wasn’t a smooth process by any means, but it had to be done.”

The drive to push the Getzen Company back to the top continues today. In the last fifteen years, the company has designed and offered several different generations of professional instruments. Although some didn’t make it to production or last long as models, they all taught their own valuable lessens. Lessens that allowed the company to make improvements across the board and brought the product line to where it is today. “Since buying the company back we have gone through a lot of R&D looking for the ‘right’ designs. Especially with our professional trumpets.” says Tom. “It took us awhile, but the pro horns we’re putting out now are better than anything the company has built in the past. Now when players think of Getzen, quality and craftsmanship are the first things that come to mind and we are once again an industry leader.”

“The last fifteen years definitely did bring along a lot changes,” remarks Tom. “Hopefully, the next fifteen will be even better for the family, the company, and our customers.”

News from the Road

Saturday, March 4th, 2006

Goteborg Brass Band in Elkhorn
Tom Getzen (far right) welcomed the Goteborg Brass Band to Elkhorn in October. The band members toured the factory and spent time play testing Getzen and Edwards instruments. The band and its members purchased several 3850 Bb and 3892 Eb cornets and 3895 flugelhorns to add to their impressive inventory of Getzen small brass.

For more information on the band visit www.goteborgbrassband.org.se.

ike Vax, Tom Getzen and Johnny Brit
Mike Vax (left) and Tom Getzen (center) listen on while Getzen artist Johnny Brit test drives the new 3001MV trumpet during the 2006 NAMM show in Anaheim, CA.